If poem by rudyard kipling summary line by line

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if poem by rudyard kipling summary line by line

If: A Fathers Advice to His Son by Rudyard Kipling

If

If you can keep your head when all about you
Are losing theirs and blaming it on you;
If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you,
But make allowance for their doubting too:
If you can wait and not be tired by waiting,
Or, being lied about, dont deal in lies,
Or being hated dont give way to hating,
And yet dont look too good, nor talk too wise;

If you can dream---and not make dreams your master;
If you can think---and not make thoughts your aim,
If you can meet with Triumph and Disaster
And treat those two impostors just the same:.
If you can bear to hear the truth youve spoken
Twisted by knaves to make a trap for fools,
Or watch the things you gave your life to, broken,
And stoop and buildem up with worn-out tools;

If you can make one heap of all your winnings
And risk it on one turn of pitch-and-toss,
And lose, and start again at your beginnings,
And never breathe a word about your loss:
If you can force your heart and nerve and sinew
To serve your turn long after they are gone,
And so hold on when there is nothing in you
Except the Will which says to them: Hold on!

If you can talk with crowds and keep your virtue,
Or walk with Kings---nor lose the common touch,
If neither foes nor loving friends can hurt you,
If all men count with you, but none too much:
If you can fill the unforgiving minute
With sixty seconds worth of distance run,
Yours is the Earth and everything thats in it,
And---which is more---youll be a Man, my son!
Rudyard Kipling
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Published 11.12.2018

if poem Runyard Kipling meaning cartoon

The poem 'If' by the India-born British is 32 lines long with four stanzas of .
Rudyard Kipling

Rudyard Kipling: Poems Summary and Analysis of "If-"

The poet is addressing his son in the poem, shedding light on his beliefs and conveying those to his son. The poem is directly addressed to the reader, in an attempt to open their eyes into believing in themselves. In the first half of the poem, the speaker states that if you can keep focused while others lose their heads, if you can keep your patience and temperament while others lose theirs, and deal with not looking too good or talking too wisely; the poet stops, moving on to the second stanza. In the second stanza, the poet talks about dreaming but not letting those dreams cloud your reason, mentions thinking and simultaneously taking action. In the words of the poet he illustrates the following remarks such as, if you can deal both sides of triumph and disaster, if you can handle when other people twist your truth into despicable lies, or for that matter, if, you can turn the things from dead to alive again; before moving onto the latter part of the poem still not giving a concluding remark. The poet then states, if you can keep it a secret the fact that you bet all your winnings in one fell swoop ultimately losing it, if you have the willingness to hold on, when everything else fails, talk with kings without being pretentious, if you have the ability to handle foes and friends, if you see that men count on you but not too much for that matter, and most importantly, if you can fill every moment with ease, then you will have every tangible and intangible element that Earth offers. By clicking "Log In", you agree to our terms of service and privacy policy.

The poem is a paean to British stoicism and masculine rectitude; almost every line in each stanza begins with "If". The poem's speaker says that if you can keep your head while those around you lose theirs; if you can trust yourself when others doubt you; if you can be patient and not lose your temper; if you can handle being lied about but not lie yourself, and being hated but not hating yourself; if you do not look too good or talk too wise:. If you can dream but not let those dreams cloud your reason; if you can think but still take action; if you can deal with both triumph and disaster; if you can handle it when others twist your truths into lies, or take the things you devoted your life to and turn them from broken into alive again:. If you can take all of your winnings and bet them in one fell swoop and lose them all and then keep it a secret; if you can use your heart and muscles and nerves to hold on even when there is only Will left:. If you can remain virtuous among people and talk with Kings without becoming pretentious; if you can handle foes and friends with ease; if you see that men count on you but not too much; if you can fill every minute with meaning:.

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Many people consider this poem to be one of the most inspirational, and the poem has garnered much attention in popular culture. You can read the full poem here. Throughout the poem, the speaker gives the reader multiple scenarios, both positive and negative, along with a glimpse into how one should conduct oneself. The poem has an almost mathematical proof about it with its if-then scenario. Kipling separates his poem into four stanzas of equal length; each stanza contains eight lines. Each stanza has a set rhyme scheme of ababcdcd, with the exception of the first stanza, which has the following rhyme scheme: aaaabcbc.

If you can keep your head when all about you Are losing theirs and blaming it on you;. If you can trust yourself when all men doubt you, But make allowance for their doubting too:. If you can wait and not be tired by waiting, Or, being lied about, don't deal in lies,. Or being hated don't give way to hating, And yet don't look too good, nor talk too wise;. All rights reserved. Lines If you can keep your head when all about you Are losing theirs and blaming it on you; Well, we've got a poem called "If" and, whaddya know, "if" is the first word of the poem.

The poet conveys his ideas about how to win this life, and after all, how to be a good human being. It is a tribute to Leander Starr Jameson. You may read more about the poem at Wikipedia. The whole poem is written in a single complex sentence. This structure of the poem was important to achieve the conditional goal.

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